Augering Well on The Carrs

Removing a Russian Corer with a peat sample

Removing a Russian Corer with a peat sample

Last month The Carrs played host to some students from Royal Holloway University of London (RHUL) who made the trip up north especially to take soil core samples from fields in the vicinity of Star Carr. Over the course of several days they honed their craft in Holocene Sediment Coring. Why come all this way to study some sediments and what makes these ones so remarkable?

There is a branch of geography concerned with the climatic and environmental history experienced by humans in the past. Clues may be found and interpreted within the layers of sediments deposited in lakes and bogs – where thick piles of mud or sediment have accumulated over thousands of years. The Flixton Basin is one such place and possibly among the best in Northern Europe for the study of sediments from the Holocene epoch  (that is, the last 12,000 or so years).

Read more about Holocene Sediments in a brand new post on the Heritage section of the website.

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