Tag Archives: Archaeology

The last ever digs at Star Carr?

Star Carr excavations in, June 2014

Last year’s Star Carr excavations, in June 2014.

Summer 2015 saw a final  excavations season at the Mesolithic site of Star Carr near Seamer, Scarborough as the University of York’s five year long Postglacial research project, funded by the European Research Council, draws to a close. Being located on private farmland with no public access, it can be easy to understand why so many people living nearby are still in the dark about this Stone Age site. Many thousands of people must have unwittingly passed by on the A64 trunk road into Scarborough, just a kilometer or so from Star Carr.

Mind you, even if one did get close to the site there is not much to see to the untrained eye but a typical Yorkshire field…..that is unless you were there when archaeological investigators were at work. Even then,the digs were only transient windows into the past – the excavations being filled in after each season to protect the material from the elements. It’s now a Yorkshire field again.

Luckily for us the Star Carr team and various students made some short films in their final few digging seasons about the excavations,  the artefacts found there and their significance, about the story of the site’s discovery over 60 years ago and about the experiences of some of the students, researchers and volunteers who have worked on the digs.
Some videos you might want to check out are below. These are the ones that area easily located on YouTube but if you find any good ones not listed do contact us and we’ll add them.

Skulls, Shamans and Sacrifice in Stone Age Britain Published on 13 Jul 2015

The Mesolithic settlement of Star Carr in North Yorkshire has fascinated archaeologists for decades. Nicky Milner and her digging team from York University are embarking on their final ever excavation on site to unlock the secrets of this mysterious landscape. They’ve been filming every moment of discovery to give us a glimpse into our ancient past.

A Mystery of Star Carr Published on 23 May 2013

A film made in support of the Yorkshire Museum’s exhibition “After the Ice”, which opens on 24th May 2013. The film is about the pre-historic antler frontlets excavated in 1951 at Star Carr, Yorkshire. Made by Adam Clark, Olivia Morrill, and Susan De Val. To keep updated with our progress, check out our blog!

A 3-minute film on the history of the archaeological site of Star Carr. This film was created by Emma Carr, Jenna Tinning, and Kelly Guerrieri for the Yorkshire Museum’s exhibition ‘After the Ice’. Check out the blogs where we update you on all our progress at: http://yorkstudentheritage.blogspot.co.uk

The People of Star Carr Published on 23 May 2014  

A 3 minute film produced by Katrina Gargett and Lexi Baker, two BA Heritage Studies students at the University of York. It has been made for display at The Yorkshire Museum and features the archaeologists who previously worked at the Mesolithic site of Star Carr, North Yorkshire.

When Star Carr made international headlines in 2010 for the discovery of evidence of Briatain’s oldest ‘house’ the news was shared all over the world… Archaeologists Uncover Britains Oldest House Uploaded on 13 Aug 2010  Archaeologists say they have discovered Britain’s oldest house at a Stone Age site in northern England. Researchers say the house dates back 10,500 years.

In Focus: Star Carr   Uploaded on 18 Aug 2011 (Archaeosoup Productions)

Welcome to In Focus. In this series we take a closer look at particular sites, finds and objects from the world of Archaeology.

The www.starcarr.com website also has some videos of excavations in recent years which you can look at here. One in particular, The Other Side of the Antler filmed in 2006 at the beginning of the modern phase of investigations by the Vale of Pickering Research Trust gives a detailed look at the digs that year. Did you know how important Star Carr is to archaeologists? It has been said that Star Carr is as important for the Mesolithic period as Stonehenge is to the Neolithic.  Scarborough Borough Council owns a field close by to the scheduled Star Carr site which has some similar topographic features and has also been the site of digs and test pits over the years. It is still hoped that a way can be found to promote public access to the vicinity of Star Carr.

 

Flixton Island goes on the market

13.07.16 Flixton Carr hay bales view

One of the parcels of peatland pasture put up for sale at Flixton Bridge, adjacent to the Mesolithic site of Flixton Island.

A piece of Stone Age real estate has gone on the market, offering a chance for someone sympathetic to its archaeological significance to purchase a chunk of ‘Palaeo-Lake-side’ property.

A number of parcels of pasture land near Flixton Bridge, Scarborough, including the heritage sites of ‘Flixton Island’ and ‘No Name Hill’ are currently up for sale.
Link to sale particulars on http://www.rightmove.co.uk  Link to the sale brochure (pdf download) from RightMove. The archaeology here ties closely to that of the more famous Star Carr Mesolithic site just a few hundred metres west. The renowned  Star Carr research project has focussed recent summer fieldwork investigations on Flixton Island, and indeed the field has been the location for filming by Channel Four’s Time Team and hosted public open days to show people the digs taking place. The Star Carr Team are hopeful that the sale of the land will not jeopardise the heritage of the site, which has no formal statutory protection, but is, for a few years more subject to an HLS stewardship agreement, including an undertaking not to plough the Flixton Island and No Name Hill fields. The HLS parcels are lightly grazed or cut for hay and they are managed to encourage wetland bird species such as Lapwing.
We do not have the funds or the expertise to buy and manage the land, but we are hoping that someone who is sympathetic to archaeology will end up purchasing it.
Flixton Bridge lies near the centre of the deep ‘fen peat’ soils left behind by the Stone Age wetland known as Palaeolake Flixton. Today it sits on the Hertford floodplain, the drainage cut of the same name slicing right along the length of the former like of 12,000 years ago. (Read more on the drainage of the Vale of Pickering landscape here) But in the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic, as human hunter-gatherer societies were beginning to settle and exploit the natural resources around them there were some small areas of land that rose above the waters of Lake Flixton, where glacial gravels and sands gave them a modest elevation. These islands are still discernible today to the visitor to this pastoral landscape, and represent important Prehistoric sites which are still giving up their stories to modern day archaeologists.
The village of Flixton, with the flat land of Flixton Carr beyond

Flixton village with the flat land of Flixton Carr beyond

Reporting from Star Carr, a Peek in the Peat…

It was a windy day in the Vale of Pickering when archaeologists Michael Bamforth and Becky Knight from the University of York and Ian Panter from the York Archaeological Trust were interviewed by Sue Nelson for BBC Radio 4 . The team walked along the River Hertford to view the field that harbours the Palaeo Lake Flixton under its turf, and visualise what the site would have looked back in the Stone Age.

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Archaeology has become an interdisciplinary field of research which has benefited greatly in recent decades by utilising scientific methods such as chemical isotope analyses and radiocarbon dating. This short interview was conducted in the field and followed up in the chemistry labs at York. It focuses on  the interaction of science and archaeology, and the impact of Star Carr in terms of Mesolithic discoveries.

The 8-minute interview is destined for broadcast on Radio 4’s Inside Science programme, so tune in to hear more about the challenges facing Star Carr’s buried artefacts.

by Fevziye Hasan