Tag Archives: Flixton

Flixton Island goes on the market

13.07.16 Flixton Carr hay bales view

One of the parcels of peatland pasture put up for sale at Flixton Bridge, adjacent to the Mesolithic site of Flixton Island.

A piece of Stone Age real estate has gone on the market, offering a chance for someone sympathetic to its archaeological significance to purchase a chunk of ‘Palaeo-Lake-side’ property.

A number of parcels of pasture land near Flixton Bridge, Scarborough, including the heritage sites of ‘Flixton Island’ and ‘No Name Hill’ are currently up for sale.
Link to sale particulars on http://www.rightmove.co.uk  Link to the sale brochure (pdf download) from RightMove. The archaeology here ties closely to that of the more famous Star Carr Mesolithic site just a few hundred metres west. The renowned  Star Carr research project has focussed recent summer fieldwork investigations on Flixton Island, and indeed the field has been the location for filming by Channel Four’s Time Team and hosted public open days to show people the digs taking place. The Star Carr Team are hopeful that the sale of the land will not jeopardise the heritage of the site, which has no formal statutory protection, but is, for a few years more subject to an HLS stewardship agreement, including an undertaking not to plough the Flixton Island and No Name Hill fields. The HLS parcels are lightly grazed or cut for hay and they are managed to encourage wetland bird species such as Lapwing.
We do not have the funds or the expertise to buy and manage the land, but we are hoping that someone who is sympathetic to archaeology will end up purchasing it.
Flixton Bridge lies near the centre of the deep ‘fen peat’ soils left behind by the Stone Age wetland known as Palaeolake Flixton. Today it sits on the Hertford floodplain, the drainage cut of the same name slicing right along the length of the former like of 12,000 years ago. (Read more on the drainage of the Vale of Pickering landscape here) But in the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic, as human hunter-gatherer societies were beginning to settle and exploit the natural resources around them there were some small areas of land that rose above the waters of Lake Flixton, where glacial gravels and sands gave them a modest elevation. These islands are still discernible today to the visitor to this pastoral landscape, and represent important Prehistoric sites which are still giving up their stories to modern day archaeologists.
The village of Flixton, with the flat land of Flixton Carr beyond

Flixton village with the flat land of Flixton Carr beyond

Augering Well on The Carrs

Removing a Russian Corer with a peat sample

Removing a Russian Corer with a peat sample

Last month The Carrs played host to some students from Royal Holloway University of London (RHUL) who made the trip up north especially to take soil core samples from fields in the vicinity of Star Carr. Over the course of several days they honed their craft in Holocene Sediment Coring. Why come all this way to study some sediments and what makes these ones so remarkable?

There is a branch of geography concerned with the climatic and environmental history experienced by humans in the past. Clues may be found and interpreted within the layers of sediments deposited in lakes and bogs – where thick piles of mud or sediment have accumulated over thousands of years. The Flixton Basin is one such place and possibly among the best in Northern Europe for the study of sediments from the Holocene epoch  (that is, the last 12,000 or so years).

Read more about Holocene Sediments in a brand new post on the Heritage section of the website.

Stone Age Sounds at Flixton

Mesolithic Open Days at Flixton Island, Vale of Pickering
See the latest excavations and finds, experience sounds of the Mesolithic, quiz the experts, walk the landscape, volunteer to dig!

Meet the Star Carr Project Team and Tim Burkinshaw of the Carrs Wetland Project

The Star Carr Mesolithic Project Team are holding an open weekend at their excavations at Flixton Island between 10am and 4pm on Saturday 24 and Sunday 25 August. Please come along and visit them to learn more about the Late Palaeolithic and Mesolithic sites that they are digging.

  • Site tours both Saturday 24-Aug and Sunday 25-Aug:
    >> 10.00, 12.30, 15.30 | tours last about 30 minutes
  • Opportunity to see some of the recent finds
  • Experience the “Mesolithic soundscape” where you can sit in the middle of a circle of speakers and immerse yourself in reconstructed Mesolithic sounds – wild animals, flint knapping, boating across the lake
  • Visit the book stall | Star Carr booklet £2 or the book £13 | profits go towards further public events
  • On the Saturday only, guided walks around the wetland landscape with Tim Burkinshaw of The Carrs Wetland Project – join Tim to look for clues of shrinking peat soils and learn how local farmers are helping to protect the heritage of this floodplain landscape and its wildlife:
    >> 11.00 and 14.00 | walks last about an hour

Directions

The site is located down North Street in Flixton near Scarborough North Yorkshire, YO11 3UA, Grid ref: TA 039 812. You can either park in Flixton and walk down North Street or drive down North Street. North Street is a single track lane with limited passing or turning space. It is possible to drive down to the site and park off-road in the field adjacent to the dig by kind permission of the farmer.

If you choose to drive down the lane please proceed very slowly with great care for pedestrians, dogs, horses, etc.

The pub in Flixton village, The Fox Hound Inn cannot provide parking unless you intend to have lunch there and as it is bank holiday it may be worth booking in | Tel 01723 890301

How to volunteer

Anyone who would still like a chance to volunteer for excavations, please email the Project Manager, Mike Bamforth who is arranging these opportunities. Further info on http://www.starcarr.com

[This post reproduced with permission of Teeside Archaeological Society eNews Archive ]

New Year Deer

In my first week back at work in 2013 my reward for checking on the wetland fields near Flixton Bridge was a close encounter with five beautiful Roe Deer. I first spotted the group some 500m distant but as I was downwind they perhaps didn’t notice me til they were close. It was a treat to watch them negotiate a water-filled ditch and clear a low hedge before setting off at a sprint away from me. I captured this young stag with my compact camera as it crossed an open field east of Star Carr. Nice to get the drainage board’s digger in the distance, working on Black Dike drain. These fields used to be Set Aside a 13.01.04 030running roe and digger Star Carrfew years ago which gave them a little more cover to hide in. They also spend a lot of time in small woodland coverts but are actually quite commonly seen on The Carrs. Not usually so close though. My first Roes of the New Year.